I-CAR clarifies response to automotive groups on OEM repair procedures

Automotive groups in 2011 requested I-CAR position on OEM repair procedures.


In its recent response to the November 2011 request submitted jointly to I-CAR by Collision Repair Specialists, (SCRS), Automotive Service Association (ASA), Alliance of Automotive Service Providers (AASP) and Assured Performance Network (APN), requesting I-CAR to support various OEM repair procedure I-CAR attempted to be clear and succinct. (This was reported by VSP on March 26). This brevity appears to have resulted in certain assumptions and conclusions that are not consistent with what I-CAR intended to communicate. I-CAR thanks SCRS, AASP and APN for its letter dated April 12th, and the opportunity it provided to further clarify I-CAR’s position and intentions.

I-CAR released the following statement signed by William Brower, chairman, and John Van Alstyne, president and CEO:

I-CAR firmly believes that OEM collision repair procedures are the industry standard for complete and safe repairs. For the past 30 years, OEM collision repair procedures have been referred to by I-CAR in its training and advisory services to the industry, and I-CAR utilizes these procedures where they exist as the foundation for developing course curriculum. This remains I-CAR’s intent going forward.

As expressed in the original request received by I-CAR, I-CAR also recognizes there are opportunities to address gaps and enhance both OEM procedures and related collision repair best practices that work together to support complete and safe repairs.
The good news is that today, there exists more OEM collision repair information than ever before. Unfortunately, not all OEMs offer collision repair procedures in the U.S. market, nor do all OEMs offer consistent levels of collision repair information. When no collision repair procedures exist, collision repair professionals must use their available knowledge to make a complete, safe and minimally intrusive repair.

I-CAR is committed to helping the industry close these gaps by working closely with the industry and the OEMs to research, develop, and deliver collision repair procedures where none exist, and to work towards standardization of the information provided. Furthermore, except when contributing as a subject matter expert under contract by an OEM, I-CAR will not develop vehicle-specific collision repair procedures.

There also exists a need for collision repair best practices that directly complement, support and supplement vehicle OEM repair procedures.

In many cases, OEM repair procedures provide recommendations for say spot weld locations or recommended attachment methods, as examples. But additional processes are required to complete the repair in accordance with the OEM recommendation that may not be adequately covered by the OEM procedure. As examples: What are the most efficient/effective ways to remove spot welds? When GMA (MIG) welding, which techniques should be used to best control heat and how should welds be dressed following welding? I-CAR can contribute to this body of information and knowledge, by working with OEMs on repair procedure enhancements, and through documentation of collision repair best practices in a manner similar to the I-CAR UPCRs and certain I-CAR Advantage articles, and by incorporating this information into future I-CAR curriculum.

Additionally, across the industry, there exists varying perspectives on repair practices and an expressed need for balance amongst collision repairers, insurers, suppliers and OEMs. Ongoing work to improve collaboration and consensus in these areas must be performed from a perspective of neutrality with an uncompromising priority on complete and safe repairs for the consumer.

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