Venchurs CNG utilizes new 3M tank for compressed natural gas conversions

The new 3M tank is lighter and more cost effective, making compressed natural gas powered vehicles more feasible for fleet use.


Venchurs CNG is pleased to announce its new collaboration with 3M, utilizing the company's newly certified compressed natural gas (CNG) tank. The 21.5x60 inch tank, which is designed for light and medium duty trucks, is lighter, offers greater capacity and is more cost effective, making it a better tank solution for CNG conversions. The tank will be showcased at the NTEA Work Truck Show, March 6-8 in Indianapolis in 3M's booth #5658 and Venchurs' booth #645.

"The fuel tank is the most expensive component to a CNG conversion," said Jeff Wyatt, CEO of Venchurs. "By implementing the use of 3M's new tank, we're hoping to cut our costs and ultimately the price of our conversions, making CNG powered vehicles a more viable option for fleet and retail customers alike."

With unparalleled technology and customer support and service, as well as the ability to further customize vehicles with bumpers, wheels, tires, etc., Venchurs offers the ultimate solution for fleets wanting CNG powered trucks. While the CNG dedicated model is a fit for those located in areas of heavy infrastructure, the bi-fuel model eliminates range anxiety by offering a combined total range of over 650 miles and on-the-fly switching between fuel types. Because Venchurs is a Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) for Ford Motor Company, the original Ford warranty stays intact and the conversions can be financed through Ford Credit.

Venchurs has a ship-thru facility in Louisville, Kentucky, as well as a remote ship-thru facility in Adrian, Michigan where trucks can be customized to meet all the needs of the customer. From suspension modifications to bumpers, wheels and tires, Venchurs is a one-stop shop for all your company fleet needs.

Companies interested in adding CNG Ford F-250s or F-350s to their fleets are invited to apply for Venchurs' short term loaner program, where they can put the converted trucks to the test. 

We Recommend