GE and Clean Energy collaborate on LNG projects

Clean Energy to use GE's MicroLNG Technology at two LNG facilities; MicroLNG technology builds on GE Oil & Gas' large LNG projects.


Natural gas is an abundant, reliable and cleaner-burning source of energy for consumers and commercial users. Clean Energy Fuels and GE are promoting the importance of natural gas to the U.S. economy, enabling energy independence and decreasing CO2 emissions—in this case, by enabling long-haul trucks and fleets to move from diesel to cleaner, more efficient and readily available domestic natural gas.

"GE is committed to natural gas. From extraction to transport to power generation—we continue to develop solutions that infuse new technologies into the value chain and help improve every step of the natural gas development and deployment life cycle," said Dan Heintzelman, president and CEO of GE Oil & Gas. "Our ecomagination-qualified MicroLNG plant was born from the same turbomachinery technology that has made GE a success in large LNG compression such as in the world-scale plants in Qatar and Australia. By taking this technology and reengineering it so that it's modular and highly efficient, we are able to help customers such as Clean Energy deliver this abundant and cleaner fuel source to the market."

GE's MicroLNG plant can liquefy natural gas at any point along a gas distribution network, making it ideal for supporting the fueling of vehicles in remote locations by reducing the impact of long distance fuel transport. This MicroLNG technology is part of GE's expanding technology offerings in the natural gas-for-transportation sector.         

The new GE MicroLNG system that will be used by Clean Energy will produce 250,000 gallons of LNG per day, or about 54 million DGEs (diesel gallon equivalents) per year with the built-in capability for further expansion, which is a 67 percent increase over the capacity of the breakthrough MicroLNG plant that GE Oil & Gas first introduced in January of 2012. The new system will help reduce a fleet operator's fuel costs by more than 25 percent compared to diesel fuel. LNG produced with this MicroLNG system can be used to fuel approximately 28,000 heavy trucks, replacing diesel-powered trucks with equivalent fuel economy. This could enable fleet operators to avoid more than 139,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions per year, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of approximately 27,000 cars using gasoline or 7,000 trucks using diesel on U.S. roads—assuming an average truck travels approximately 14,000 miles per year.

GE also is providing turnkey process/plant construction and consultations on optimal plant location and power partner. The scope of the agreement also includes project installation. It entails not only the liquefaction but also the complete process design from the pre-treatment of the gas to the storage system.

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