Meritor adds new equipment in response to demand for remanufactured components

Valued at $2.7 million, improvements include six new pieces of production equipment, all currently installed and operational.


To meet its North American customers' growing need for remanufactured components, especially brake shoes, Meritor has announced the continuance of investment in improvements at its remanufacturing facility in Plainfield, Ind. Doug Wolma, general manager, Global Aftermarket Operations, Meritor, announced the improvements during an industry media briefing.

Valued at $2.7 million, the improvements include six new pieces of production equipment, all currently installed and operational: two pass-thru ovens to aid in cleaning efficiencies, two latest-technologies "barrel blasters" (which replace 14 pieces of equipment previously used), an additional dual-cylinder coining press, and new automation to feed equipment with less material handling. 

"This major investment in production equipment underscores our commitment to continuing Meritor's leadership position in the global remanufacturing business," said Joe Mejaly, president, Aftermarket and Trailer, Meritor.  "We are dedicated to further enhancing our capabilities in remanufacturing technology to be the partner of choice for truck operators of all sizes, as well as dealers and distributors."

Additionally, the 275,000-square-foot Plainfield structure recently underwent a significant facility upgrade. Three years ago, the company invested $1 million dollars in its paint system, a critically important step in manufacturing the market-accepted Meritor PlatinumShield reman brake shoe. 

With more than 15 million PlatinumShield brake shoes in service, along with thousands of Meritor brand and all-makes axle carriers, transmissions, hydraulic brake calipers, steering gears and drivelines, Meritor is leveraging its experience to enhance the performance of current product lines and grow its remanufactured product portfolio. According to Wolma, this demand for remanufactured product will grow in the future.

"We see the scope going beyond the mechanical type products remanufactured in large quantities today and expanding into more sophisticated electronic components," said Wolma. "Our product portfolio will grow, change, shift, and broaden to include electronics, controls and mechatronics."

More truck owners are opting for remanufactured components for reduced costs and nationwide warranty. Recently, the increased number of remanufactured components has matched the influx of used trucks in the marketplace.

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