Sales Tip: Haul a trailer instead of driving a truck

Larry Moskalyk, an independent mobile distributor in Largo, FL, thinks outside of the box, or truck, in this case. The distributor selling the trailer had bought it new in 2006 and refurbished the interior with carpeted walls and wood shelves. The trailer had four shelves on both walls and...


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Larry Moskalyk, an independent mobile distributor in Largo, FL, thinks outside of the box, or truck, in this case.

The distributor selling the trailer had bought it new in 2006 and refurbished the interior with carpeted walls and wood shelves. The trailer had four shelves on both walls and lights mounted on the ceiling. The distributor had only been in business for nine months and was leaving the business for another opportunity.

Moskalyk bought the trailer for less than one-tenth the purchase price of the second tool truck he had leased as a flag dealer.

He hooked the trailer to his Chevy Silverado pickup truck. To ensure power, he purchased a Honda 3000 inverter generator and fastened it to the trailer's front guard rail. He chose that model generator because it was the only one that came with a 100 percent, three-year warranty. The generator can run three straight days on three gallons of fuel.

There were other advantages.

He caught a big break on insurance. Where he had paid $13,000 per year to insure his tool truck, he pays much less for the trailer. Because the trailer attaches to his Silverado, his pickup vehicle's insurance, which costs a fraction of his tool truck's insurance, covers the trailer.

He caught an even bigger break on fuel. Traveling 100 miles a week costs him $100 in gas, which is less than half of what he paid with his tool truck. In addition, his pickup is more comfortable to drive than was his tool truck. "It's a lot more relaxing; it's a simple, laid back way to do it."

The only disadvantage with the trailer is that it is more difficult to park in some places, he notes.

 


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