OSHA releases new tire training resources

Materials are designed to help technicians identify a problem before someone gets hurt


It has been more than 30 years since the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released its regulation 29 CFR 1910.177 which covers the procedures for servicing single- and multi-piece truck tire assemblies. A major component of that standard was a set of wall charts that detailed the demounting, mounting and inflation procedures, as well as the matching components for multi-piece rims.

Several years ago, a TIA official spoke at a convention and made some comments regarding the outdated material contained in OSHA’s tire and wheel wall charts.

When most of the commercial truck tire market consisted of multi-piece rims, the information was valuable and relevant. But the industry has been predominantly tubeless with single-piece rims for the past couple of decades, so the OSHA charts at the time were almost useless from a training perspective.

As it turned out, someone from OSHA was in the audience and that particular presentation initiated a chain of events that ultimately resulted in the addition of another OSHA chart, wherein the safety guidelines for single-piece assemblies could be more thoroughly explained.

New OSHA Manual

Another significant improvement that resulted from TIA’s direct request was the creation of the new OSHA manual that contains all of the information in the agency’s wall charts.

Back in 1996, TIA literally took a scissors to the OSHA charts and pasted the material to 8.5” by 11” paper so it could be included in TIA training programs.

At the time, the OSHA definition for “charts” was: “Charts” means the U. S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration publications entitled Demounting and Mounting Procedures for Truck/Bus Tires and Multi-Piece Rim Wheel Matching Chart; the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publications entitled Demounting and Mounting Procedures for Truck/Bus Tires and Multi-Piece Rim Wheel Matching Chart; or any other poster which contains at least the same instructions, safety precautions and other information contained in the charts that is applicable to the types of wheels being serviced.

TIA recognized that some OSHA inspectors would zero in on the “any other poster” language and, therefore, not recognize the information in the manual format. However, TIA felt it was practically impossible for a road service technician to utilize a poster in the field and a poster would be less effective in the classroom.

From an industry standpoint, there weren’t any widespread issues of businesses being cited for having the booklets instead of the posters, so it hasn’t been a problem. Nevertheless, TIA still pointed it out to the OSHA officials so it could be addressed as well.

Manual or Poster Format

OSHA now allows “charts” to be in manual or poster form. Moreover, it will accept any other manual or poster that provides at least the same instructions, safety precautions and other information contained in the aforementioned publications which are applicable to the types of wheels being serviced.

With the charts in the official OSHA format, there are also no more excuses for failing to make them available in the service area, which includes service trucks. Manufacturers can now include them as part of their service manuals, and anyone with a printer and Internet connection can download them at no cost by visiting TIA’s website: http://www.tireindustry.org/cts.asp.

Interestingly enough, OSHA is not printing the actual posters. The agency agrees with TIA that the manual format is much more effective and will have a broader reach.

Procedures for Safety

The new Demounting and Mounting Procedures for Tube-Type Truck and Bus Tires contains most of the information in the old demount/mount chart. It still includes the language requiring technicians to deflate both tires before loosening the lug nuts on a tube-type demountable rim assembly because people continue to get injured or killed when something goes wrong.

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