Stop for Maintenance

Medium duty vocational brakes are unquestionably a heavy wear item, but can proper maintenance practices help extend component life?


From maintenance to replacement, high service items like brakes have slowly become the itch fleets can't reach as technology and duty cycles continue to increase equipment down time. WEIGHING THE COST With forty years of brake experience under his belt, Randy Petresh, vice president of...


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"As we try to specify what brakes should be in the system, it's driven by what the customer says the vehicle will be carrying," says Bendix's Runels. "If they overload them, the symptoms may become excessive wear or overheating-which is certainly a symptom indicating that you will have excessive wear or fade. As far as overloading the vehicle, we would try to specify a brake system that would be within the limits of the vehicle, and hope that the vehicle is used that way."

Regardless of how crisp a fleet's maintenance schedule may be, if trucks are continually being overloaded, the schedules become useless.

"If you are overloading, you are exceeding the design requirements of the components involved," Petresh warns fleet managers. "So, you will have more unplanned or emergency problems because you can't plan normal replacement cycles if you are exceeding the design requirements of the hardware, components will break prematurely, at random, without notice, and significantly increase your downtime, repair costs and equipment utilization."

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