Anti-idling Tip Sheet

FLEET MAINTENANCE EDITORIAL STAFF attended a recent Society of Automotive Engineers event, and one of the biggest concerns among fleet officials there was the ramifications of California’s new anti-idling regulation that goes into effect Jan. 1.

According to the law, trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 10,000 pounds can idle for only five minutes. The law had previously exempted sleeper berth trucks.

In particular, the main source of angst was the question of allowing passive regeneration of diesel particulate filters. Good news: According to the California Air Resources Board (CARB), idling during regeneration is exempt.

Here are some answers from CARB on other common questions.

WHY IS THERE AN IDLING LIMIT?
Unnecessary idling produces emissions that contribute to cancer, other serious problems and premature death. It also wastes fuel and contributes to global warming.

WHAT ARE THE PENALTIES FOR VIOLATORS?
Violators may be fined up to $1,000 per day and may face criminal charges.

WHEN IS IDLING ALLOWED?
Instances when drivers can idle their trucks include: being stuck due of traffic, weather or mechanical failure; when being inspected or serviced; queuing beyond 100 feet of a residential area or if the truck’s engine meets option NOx idling emission standards and the truck is beyond 100 feet from a residential area.

WHAT RESTRICTIONS APPLY TO IDLE REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES?
Drivers cannot operate a diesel-fueled APU for more than five minutes if located within 100 feet of a residential area. If your truck has a 2007 or newer engine, your diesel-fueled APU or fuel-fired heater must also meet additional equipment requirements.

DOES MY TRUCK NEED A NEW LABEL?
Special hood labels will be required for trucks with 2007 or newer engines with an engine-based APU, or trucks with engines that meet the optional NOx idling emission standard that idle for more than five minutes.

WHAT CAN I DO NOW FOR CAB COMFORT?
Idle-reduction technologies include: battery-powered auxiliary power systems; fuel-fired heaters and diesel-fired APUs (restrictions apply); TSEs (truck stop electrification) that provide heating, cooling, electricity and other services at various locations. For information about cab comfort technologies, visit http://arb.ca.gov/cabcomfort

According to CARB, other laws, regulations and restrictions not listed here may apply. For more information about anti-idling regulations, visit http://arb.ca.gov/noidle

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